La Bohème. Toulouse-Lautrec and the Masters of Montmartre

22/06/2018 - 21/10/2018

La Bohème. Toulouse-Lautrec and the Masters of Montmartre

Curated by Claire Leblanc and Otto Letze
22 June | 21 October 2018


Opening: 22 June, h. 19:00

Press release

The industrial revolution at the end of the 19th century led to a social change -both negative and positive - throughout Europe. While industrialisation caused harsh working conditions, it also made available a large amount of new commodities and leisure events. People might have felt that by taking advantage of these newly available items and participating in all kinds of entertainments they could escape for a short time from the bitter reality of their severe everyday toil.

As both events and products needed to be promoted to the public, mass advertising became a necessity and opened up an entirely new branch for artists, graphic designers and printing companies.
This rapid development allowed artists like Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and his contemporaries to quickly revolutionise graphic reproduction. It was the beginning of the perfect blending of an entire art sector with an independent discipline: graphic printing became poster art.

The exhibition La Bohème shows the unique lithographic œuvre of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, presented in close interaction with works by his forerunners and contemporaries, who all experienced and lived in the Paris of the Belle Époque. This overview allows the visitors to sense and understand the origins of modern mass advertising.
The presentation on the premises of the MAN - Museum of Art of the Province of Nuoro in Sardinia - will be the start of an international touring exhibition through renowned museums.

When Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec moved to Paris as an adult, he soon became a chronicler of Parisian life. He was a painter who captured the exhiliarating society of le demi-monde and its establishments: racecourses, circus tents, theatres and opera houses, cabarets and brothels which became his ateliers.
There he drew the performers as well as the audience[no virgola] in representations that were direct, admiring and merciless. He made fun of the supposedly elitist audience, illustrating it in caricatural representations and at the same time elevated the lowly actors of these establishments – the provocatively presented singers, dancers and even prostitutes – to being the stars of his works.
Through his loving and unabashed representation of the Parisian life, the spirit of this time is embedded in Toulouse-Lautrec’s art up to the present.

To hasten the publication of his observations of modern Parisian (night-)life, Toulouse-Lautrec started to experiment with lithograph printmaking from the late 1880s onwards. He employed the technique for artistic use and, through the oversize dimensions of his works, his variety of lush colours, his brushwork and chalk- and spatter techniques, he truly revolutionised the discipline.
In only ten years, up to his death in 1901, he produced three hundred and sixty-eight prints and lithograph posters, which he considered of equal importance to his paintings and drawings: Even today, his name is linked closely to his posters of Jane Avril, Yvette Guilbert and Aristide Bruant. They became classics of art history long ago.

Prior to Toulouse-Lautrec, Jules Chéret and Pierre Bonnard had intensively used posters as advertisements for different events. When Toulouse-Lautrec started to experiment with lithography, his contemporaries, well-known artists like Alfons Mucha or Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen did so as well, and they too succeeded in creating true masterpieces. During their lifetimes, and because of their work, lithographs and posters were elevated from the status of mere mass advertising media to an accepted artistic genre.

Grouped into six sections, not only the Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec is brought to life by this show, but also the Paris of his forerunners and contemporaries.
The majority of the posters in the exhibition are advertisements for events of Paris nightlife, mostly combined with an announcement for a show. Others advertise products and services – the luxury items of those days for the working class.

The complete lithographic œuvre of Toulouse-Lautrec‘s advertisement posters can be found only in two museum collections in Europe. Together with works of Alfons Mucha, Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, Pierre Bonnard[no virgola] and Felix Vallotton, a selection of a hundred and ten works will be exhibited at the MAN from 22 June to 21October 2018. The exhibition has been organised in cooperation with the Musée d’Ixelles of Brussels and the Institute for Cultural Exchange of Tübingen.

A fully illustrated catalogue in Italian and English, with text contributions by Tonino Rocca, Luigi Fassi and Claire Leblanc will be available at the museum shop of the MAN and at Silvana Editorale (www.silvanaeditoriale.it).


MAN_Museo d’Arte della Provincia di Nuoro
Via Sebastiano Satta 27
08100 Nuoro
t. 0784|252110
www.museoman.it
info@museoman.it

Petra Feriancová

An Exhibition on Doubt

15/07/2016 - 09/10/2016

Petra Feriancová

An Exhibition on Doubt

 

Press Release

From 15 July to 9 October 2016, the project room of the Man Museum will host Petra Feriancová’s project entitled An exhibition on doubt, curated by Emanuela Manca.

 The exploration of the processes of perception of reality and the construction of memory as well as the ways (hardly ever unambiguous) through which these take place are the recurring themes  in the work of Petra Feriancová. Through the use of diverse visual language - installations, photographs and texts - her works reflect reality in a fictitious way and raise doubts on the spatial and temporal dimensions in which the spectator moves.

In this installation created for the MAN Museum of Nuoro, the artist introduces a space-time situation that is open to multiple interpretations, a rearrangement of time periods and places through which to reconsider the ways of perceiving reality and art.

The spectator will have the feeling of being in a traditional ethnographic museum that illustrates Sardinia's life and occupations. The objects on display will in reality be replicas of common tools on an enlarged scale and re-made by hand with materials different from those of the originals. The change in scale and material characteristics clearly render the objects as created for purely aesthetic contemplation through a process of abolishing their functional use. They become untouchable artefacts, relics, that of which one perceives the form, even before our common knowledge realizes their initial purpose.

The exhibition thus materially calls up the idea of a faraway island, using exclusively Slovak elements - handicraft objects, photographs of folklore manifestation and festivities - determined by natural and cultural conditions that are surprisingly similar to those of Sardinia (sheep breeding, folk costumes, music, tools). The artist's aim is to demonstrate that just as our understanding and interpretation of history can be disputed, so can what appears before our eyes be persuasive even when non-existent or based on a fabrication.

Here, the typical impression of Sardinia is thus uprooted and questioned. Every representation of places is indicative of a precise reality, which in the space generated by doubt the artist succeeds in transforming into a metaphor: a process of personal interpretation that links individual experience and the mechanisms of comprehension conditioned by history and culture. Forms, images and traces of the past are received with the understanding that their original meaning has for some time been corrupted or lost, but for the very reason of this distortion of the "original" meaning the vision of reality can be questioned by redefining one's own account of the world.

Petra Feriancová's work was selected by the MAN Museum at the time of the Art Verona 2015, within the framework of the Level Zero project, to which some of Italy's most important museums of contemporary art have adhered. The exhibition has been organized with the contribution of the Slovak Art Council.

Petra Feriancová was born in 1977 in Bratislava, where she lives and works. She works mainly with texts, photographs and installations. In 2010, she was awarded the Oskar Cepan Prize for young visual artists organized by the FCS Foundation for a Civil Society, and has exhibited in many institutions, among which: Fondazione Morra Greco, (Naples, 2014), ISCP International Studio & Curatorial Program (New York, 2011) and the Brno House of Arts (2012). In 2013, she represented Slovakia and the Czech Republic at the 55th Biennial of Venice with the project titled Still the same place.

 

 

Garry Winogrand

Women (are Beautiful)

15/07/2016 - 09/10/2016

Garry Winogrand

Women (are Beautiful)

 

curated by Lola Garrido

At one year from the success of the Vivian Maier exhibition, the Museum of the Province of Nuoro is proud to announce the opening of a new important exhibition dedicated to Garry Winogrand, the father of street photography.

 

In recent years, Winogrand's (1928-1984) work has often been compared to and presented together with that of Vivian Maier. He too, as did the now famous "nanny photographer", worked in the streets of New York, starting from the early 1960s, and continued, almost obsessively, an extensive work of reportage.

Winogrand was one of the most important chroniclers of American society, as well as being one of the great international photographers of the 1960s and ‘70s. His observation of the habits of his fellow citizens, seemingly cursory, almost casual and often ironic, was influenced by the social photography of Robert Frank and Walker Evans.

Winogrand saw in the anonymous inhabitants of American cities the ideal subjects through whom to express his vision of the world, narrating unconventional stories, with no script or theatrical effects, always captured in public places: parks, zoos, shopping centers, museums, airports or during political rallies and sports events.

His technique is based on the use of wide-angle lenses. The many contact prints that have come down to us show that Winogrand went in search of a space outside his subjects, often exaggerating the slant of the camera. As has been written many times, it would be wrong to disregard the backgrounds of his shots as mere secondary elements, as irrelevant visual "noise". In Winogrand's original vision, the external details within the frame of the picture contributed to strengthening the impact and meaning of the subjects portrayed.

The MAN exhibition, curated by Lola Garrido and organized together with diChroma Photography, presents for the first time in Italy the complete collection of the photographs which in 1975 went into the famous volume “Women are Beautiful”, now a cult object. These are snapshots, proposed here in a series of original prints that celebrate the figure of women with a faithful gaze in which we see a mixture of admiration and irony, veneration and sarcasm.

In many aspects this is a controversial work, comparable to that of the poets of the Beat Generation, and was on the receiving end of much criticism. Indeed, if in the eyes of some interpreters the photographs appear as a joyous reflection on women's emancipation and sensuality, others - owing to the presence of shapely figures in succinct garb or miniskirts, or the lingering of the camera on breasts and posteriors - see them as the contorted expression of male chauvinism and misogyny.

What is certain is that it is not a superficial reflection on the new concepts of beauty, but rather a description of the social consequences of American counterculture, as well as a declaration in support of women's rights and freedom at a time when puritanism appeared to be questioning the conquests of the postwar period. The renowned photographer Joel Meyerowitz, Winogrand's friend, spoke of his work as a clash and an embrace, Winogrand as a contradiction and his images as contradictory.

***

Garry Winogrand (1928-1984) was born into a working class family in the Bronx. He began taking pictures while serving in the army. He studied painting at the City College of New York and photography at Columbia University. In 1949, he followed a course in photojournalism at the New School for Social Research of New York and from 1952 to 1969 he worked as a freelance photo reporter. His first important exhibition was at the MOMA in 1963. In 1966 he presented his photos at the exhibition Toward a social landscape at the George Eastman House in Rochester, together with Lee Friedlander, his friend and travelling companion. With Friedlander and Diane Arbus he participated in the exhibition New Documents (MOMA, 1967). He won the Guggenheim Fellowship Award three times (1964, 1969, 1979) and once the National Endowment of the Arts Award (1979). Garry Winogrand's documentary photographs appeared in magazines such as Sports Illustrated, Fortune and Life. On his death from cancer in 1984, he left an enormous archive of images, many of which never developed. A number of these were collected, exhibited and published by the MOMA in the volume Winogrand. Figments from the Real World (1988). Winogrand's works are present in the collections of the world's most important museums, such as the MOMA in New York, the Tate Modern in London and the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

Lola Garrido is an art historian specializing in photography. She curated the collection of the Banesto Foundation, which today enhances the patrimony of the Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid. As an art critic she has worked with the most important Spanish journals. Her personal collection of photographs has appeared in many exhibitions.

The MAN Museum is an institution of the Province of Nuoro supported by the Autonomous Region of Sardinia and the Banco di Sardegna Foundation. 

ROMAN SIGNER, FILMS AND INSTALLATIONS

22/04/2016 - 03/07/2016

The MAN Museum is pleased to announce the forthcoming opening of the exhibition Roman Signer. Films and Installations, curated by Lorenzo Giusti and Li Zhenhua.

With a treasure of more than two hundred films and a series of new installations created for this occasion,  the project at MAN Museum  will be the first solo exhibition of Roman Signer in an Italian museum.

Signer began his career as an artist in the second half of the 1960s, after working as an architect’s draftsman, an apprentice radio engineer and, for a short time, as a technician in a pressure cooker factory. Known for having defined a new concept of sculpture linked to process, transformation and movement, Signer created installations as actions, experiments, almost always solitary, for which he employed objects of everyday use (umbrellas, tables, boots, containers, hats, bicycles) activated by gunpowder or natural forces such as wind and water. These were processes mostly of explosions and collisions, visually and emotionally intriguing, which interpreted the empirical approach as an artistic challenge.

The MAN exhibition will be divided into two sections. The first, the result of cooperation with the Chronos Art Center of Shanghai, presents the artist's entire production of Super 8 films, a collection of 205 works covering from 1975 to 1989, the year in which Signer abandoned film and turned to other media. It is presented in a fascinating 100-channel video installation created in China and proposed here in a new, enhanced and further developed version. The video footage was shot in his San Gallo "workshop" or in natural settings, mostly in Weissbad (Canton Appenzell).

The second part of the project presents three new sculptural works created for the MAN exhibition, as always connoted by a subtle irony. Of these works, Ombrelli (2016) is a site-specific installation for the museum's staircase, a bizarre arrangement of umbrellas held together in an unstable equilibrium. Installazione (2016) is a sculpture that fills an entire room of the museum, a surreal itinerary that meditates on perception of the self and one's body, in which the observer becomes the object observed. The itinerary comes to an end with Occhiali (2016), where the light radiated by a Super 8 projector is altered by eye glasses. The sculpture is an unusual object, which seems to give an ironic view of the artist's production, on the border between sculpture and video, stillness and movement, action and vision.

he exhibition will be completed with a catalogue containing texts by Lorenzo Giusti, Li Zhenhua, Barbara Casavecchia and Rachel Withers. Besides the documentation of his new works, the catalogue will also come with a DVD presenting a collection of Signer's activities in Italy, starting from the early 1990s, in places such as Civitella d’Agliano, Stromboli, the Maremma region, and also Venice at the time of the 1999 Biennial.

Roman Signer (Appenzell, 1938) has participated in the most important international artistic exhibitions, such as Documenta in Kassel (1987), the Skulptur Projekte of Münster (1997) and the Shanghai Biennial (2012). In 1999, he represented Switzerland at the Venice Biennial. Recent personal exhibitions include: Bonnefantenmuseum in Maastricht (2000), Camden Arts Centre in London (2001), OK Centrum für Gegenwartskunst in Linz (2005), Aargauer Kunsthaus in Aarau (2006), Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin (2007), Swiss Institute New York (2010), Sala de Arte Publico Siqueiros in Mexico City (2011), Hangar à Bananes in Nantes and Kunsthalle of Mainz (2012), Kunstmuseum in Saint Gallen (2014), the Barbican Centre in London, Kunsthus Zug and Centre Culturel Suisse in Paris (2015). In China, Roman Signer’s work was recently presented at the China Academy of Arts in Hangzhou, the CAFA Art Museum in Beijing (2014), the GAFA Art Museum in Guangzhou and OCT in Shenzhen (2015).

Roman Signer. Films and Installations is a project of the MAN Museum, curated by Lorenzo Giusti and Li Zhenhua, in cooperation with the CAC-Chronos Art Center of Shanghai, with the technical partnership of the WTI International Co. Limited, the support of Pro Helvetia and the contribution of the Sardinian Region, the Province of Nuoro and the Fondazione di Sardegna.

 

Paul Klee

Animated Worlds

30/10/2015 - 14/02/2016

Following the exhibition dedicated to the relationship of Alberto Giacometti's works and archaic statues, MAN Museum of Art of the Province of Nuoro continues with its project that explores little-known aspects of the most important artists of the 20th century with an exhibition dedicated to Paul Klee (1879 - 1940).

Unprecedented in Sardinia, Klee is one of the most complex and original artists of the last century. With this exhibition, organized by the MAN Museum and the Autonomous Region of Sardinia, the Province of Nuoro and the Banco di Sardegna Foundation, curated by Pietro Bellasi and Guido Magnaguagno, with the scientific coordination of Raffaella Resch, the intention is to explore a fundamental element in the artist's work: the perception of the presence of a vital, generating principle inborn in the matter of things.

Specifically, Klee never spoke of “animism”, but his work appears permeated with an animated spirit to be discerned in all material reality and evoked by the artist's creative action. In “Superior Being” (Diaries, no. 660), through his vivifying vision the artist brings to life the generating element present in the different worlds that inhabit the cosmos, beneath the surface of things. Be they men, children, animals, objects, landscapes or architecture, Klee's worlds all obey the same law of nature, which the artist investigates and imitates.

A single vital principle governs the entire natural order, from large things down to the infinitely small. This principle seems to appear in many of the artist's works, especially in his drawings and watercolours of the 1920s and 30s. Works such as Feigenbaum (Fig Tree) of 1929, or Im Park (In the Park) of 1940, on exhibition here, and also the important painting Wohin? (Where?) of 1920, from the collection of the city of Locarno, displayed in 1937 at the Degenerate Art exhibition organized by the German nazi regime.

The representation of the animal world offers a series of parables and moral fables, where animals are elevated to the role of human beings with their vices and virtues. In the drawing Tierfreundschaft (Animal Friendship) of 1923, a dog and a cat go for a peaceful stroll, personifying the sense of friendship that can arise between two human beings.

The study of his architectural works reveals Klee's interest in the perception of form and comprehension of the organic, living element in it, evident in watercolours such as Americanisch - Japanisch (American Japanese), created in 1918, where we see stylized buildings rise beside the icon of the eye. “And once one has grasped the idea of measurability in connection with design, the study of nature will progress with greater ease and accuracy" wrote Klee (Diaries no. 536).

But the generative principle in all things can be seen declaredly mostly in the works that evoke or imitate the world of infancy, as in Hier der bestellte Wagen! (Here's the Requested Wagon) of 1935, but also in the very fine painting Getrübtes (Troubled), of 1934, from the collections of the GAM in Turin, or still again in the works where the figures are represented with simple, stylized childlike lines, as in the painting Gebärde eines Antlitzes (Expression of a Face) of 1939, from the collection of the Biella Museum.

Organic forms of life and spirits of matter enliven the different subjects present in Klee's works. An image that seems to find a formal synthesis in a work such as Figurale Blätter (Figurative Leaves) of 1938 where anthropomorphic figures, like small fetuses, live curled up in leaves representing incubators.

As an artist immersed in the spirit of his times, in which scientific discoveries followed one another at a rapid pace, Klee understood the upheavals caused by the theories of relativity and quantum physics, as well as the development of psychoanalytic studies. He reinterpreted them in his own way within a magical and phenomenic vision of the universe.

***

A catalogue of the exhibition will be published by Magonza Editore with essays by Pietro Bellasi, Guido Magnaguagno and Raffaella Resch, as well as the reproduction of all the works on display together with biographic and bibliographic notes.

Pietro Bellasi is an expert in the anthropology of art. He has lectured at the University of Bologna and the Sorbonne. He has curated several exhibitions and catalogues, among which "Giacometti e l'arcaico" Giacometti and the Archaic), Nuoro 2014; "Corpo, automi e robot" (Body, Automata and Robots), Lugano 2010, "The Giacometti. The Valley and the World"), Milan and Mannheim, 2000-2001; "Un diavolo per capello" (In a Foul Temper), Bologna 2005; Tinguely and Munari, La Spezia, 1994.

Guido Magnaguagno, a Swiss art historian, was the vice director of the Kunsthaus in Zurich and for many years the director of the Tinguely Museum in Basel. He has curated many exhibitions of contemporary art and is an expert in the history of Swiss art.

Raffaella Resch has organized and coordinated the scientific aspects of many exhibitions and catalogues at the Antonio Mazzotta Foundation. At present she works as a freelance expert with several artists and institutions.

Paul Klee

Animated Worlds

30/10/2015 - 14/02/2016

Following the exhibition dedicated to the relationship of Alberto Giacometti's works and archaic statues, MAN Museum of Art of the Province of Nuoro continues with its project that explores little-known aspects of the most important artists of the 20th century with an exhibition dedicated to Paul Klee (1879 - 1940).

Unprecedented in Sardinia, Klee is one of the most complex and original artists of the last century. With this exhibition, organized by the MAN Museum and the Autonomous Region of Sardinia, the Province of Nuoro and the Banco di Sardegna Foundation, curated by Pietro Bellasi and Guido Magnaguagno, with the scientific coordination of Raffaella Resch, the intention is to explore a fundamental element in the artist's work: the perception of the presence of a vital, generating principle inborn in the matter of things.

Specifically, Klee never spoke of “animism”, but his work appears permeated with an animated spirit to be discerned in all material reality and evoked by the artist's creative action. In “Superior Being” (Diaries, no. 660), through his vivifying vision the artist brings to life the generating element present in the different worlds that inhabit the cosmos, beneath the surface of things. Be they men, children, animals, objects, landscapes or architecture, Klee's worlds all obey the same law of nature, which the artist investigates and imitates.

A single vital principle governs the entire natural order, from large things down to the infinitely small. This principle seems to appear in many of the artist's works, especially in his drawings and watercolours of the 1920s and 30s. Works such as Feigenbaum (Fig Tree) of 1929, or Im Park (In the Park) of 1940, on exhibition here, and also the important painting Wohin? (Where?) of 1920, from the collection of the city of Locarno, displayed in 1937 at the Degenerate Art exhibition organized by the German nazi regime.

The representation of the animal world offers a series of parables and moral fables, where animals are elevated to the role of human beings with their vices and virtues. In the drawing Tierfreundschaft (Animal Friendship) of 1923, a dog and a cat go for a peaceful stroll, personifying the sense of friendship that can arise between two human beings.

The study of his architectural works reveals Klee's interest in the perception of form and comprehension of the organic, living element in it, evident in watercolours such as Americanisch - Japanisch (American Japanese), created in 1918, where we see stylized buildings rise beside the icon of the eye. “And once one has grasped the idea of measurability in connection with design, the study of nature will progress with greater ease and accuracy" wrote Klee (Diaries no. 536).

But the generative principle in all things can be seen declaredly mostly in the works that evoke or imitate the world of infancy, as in Hier der bestellte Wagen! (Here's the Requested Wagon) of 1935, but also in the very fine painting Getrübtes (Troubled), of 1934, from the collections of the GAM in Turin, or still again in the works where the figures are represented with simple, stylized childlike lines, as in the painting Gebärde eines Antlitzes (Expression of a Face) of 1939, from the collection of the Biella Museum.

Organic forms of life and spirits of matter enliven the different subjects present in Klee's works. An image that seems to find a formal synthesis in a work such as Figurale Blätter (Figurative Leaves) of 1938 where anthropomorphic figures, like small fetuses, live curled up in leaves representing incubators.

As an artist immersed in the spirit of his times, in which scientific discoveries followed one another at a rapid pace, Klee understood the upheavals caused by the theories of relativity and quantum physics, as well as the development of psychoanalytic studies. He reinterpreted them in his own way within a magical and phenomenic vision of the universe.

***

A catalogue of the exhibition will be published by Magonza Editore with essays by Pietro Bellasi, Guido Magnaguagno and Raffaella Resch, as well as the reproduction of all the works on display together with biographic and bibliographic notes.

Pietro Bellasi is an expert in the anthropology of art. He has lectured at the University of Bologna and the Sorbonne. He has curated several exhibitions and catalogues, among which "Giacometti e l'arcaico" Giacometti and the Archaic), Nuoro 2014; "Corpo, automi e robot" (Body, Automata and Robots), Lugano 2010, "The Giacometti. The Valley and the World"), Milan and Mannheim, 2000-2001; "Un diavolo per capello" (In a Foul Temper), Bologna 2005; Tinguely and Munari, La Spezia, 1994.

Guido Magnaguagno, a Swiss art historian, was the vice director of the Kunsthaus in Zurich and for many years the director of the Tinguely Museum in Basel. He has curated many exhibitions of contemporary art and is an expert in the history of Swiss art.

Raffaella Resch has organized and coordinated the scientific aspects of many exhibitions and catalogues at the Antonio Mazzotta Foundation. At present she works as a freelance expert with several artists and institutions.

Thomas Hirschhorn

3 “Easycollage” and 6 “Collage-Truth”

10/07/2015 - 18/10/2015

Thomas Hirschhorn

3 “Easycollage” and 6 “Collage-Truth”

10 July – 18 October 2015

 

With 3 “Easycollage” and 6 “Collage-Truth”, Thomas Hirschhorn transforms the MAN Museum’s project room into an uncomfortable space full of provocative suggestion and visual contrasts. The project, curated by Lorenzo Giusti, proposes a series of large-scale works and other smaller ones, created between 2012 and 2015, in which fashion photographs live side by side with war photos.

The sense of estrangement and repulsion triggered by the vision of the collages is the weapon with which Hirschhorn carries on his battle against a simplified relationship with the image and against the tendency of mass media photography to concentrate only on partial aspects of reality, which is what photography claims to capture, by removing the shades of meaning.

The imposition on the eye of bodies torn apart by war and at the same time of bodies idealized by advertising and marketing, parallels in appearance contrary to all logic of sense and aesthetics, represents a mindful strategy that aims to invert the process of assuefaction/hypersensitivation induced by the media.

Thomas Hirschhorn's works intend to create awareness among viewers of their visual experiences, to come to grips with their sensitivity and recognize the need for careful critical thought when dealing with the world of the media and, more in general, with geopolitical realities and social conditions today.

The 3 “Easycollage” and 6 “Collage-Truth” project develops along the pathway of an investigation of the collage as an instrument of critical analysis traced by Hirschhorn in recent years. His is an investigation in which the artist places side-by-side site-specific works that respond to the precise design of critically analyzing society (atmospheres created for the most part with poor materials and objects of daily use) and participatory operations that call for direct involvement of the public, as in the case of his “Presence and Production” projects such as “Deleuze Monument” (Avignon, 2000), “Bataille Monument” (Kassel, 2002), “24h Foucault” (Paris, 2004), “The Bijlmer Spinoza-Festival” (Amsterdam, 2009), “Gramsci Monument” (New York, 2013) and “Flamme éternelle” (Paris, 2014).

Thomas Hirschhorn (Bern, 1957) studied at the Schule für Gestaltung (Zürich) and moved to Paris in 1983, where he has been living since. His work has been shown in numerous museums, galleries and exhibitions among which the Venice Biennale (1999 and 2015), Documenta11 (2002), 27th Sao Paolo Biennale (2006), the 55th Carnegie International, Pittsburg (2008), the Swiss Pavillion at the 54th Venice Biennale (2011), La Triennale at Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2012), the 9th Shanghai Biennale (2012), Gladstone Gallery New York (2012), Manifesta 10 in Saint-Petersburg (2014). A selection of his writings was published by MIT Press (October Books): Critical Laboratory: The Writings of Thomas Hirschhorn. In 2015 the book Gramsci Monument was published by Dia Foundation and Koenig Books. In 2013 Thomas Hirschhorn presented the "Gramsci Monument" in the Bronx, New York. “Flamme éternelle”, his most recent “Presence and Production” project, took place at Palais de Tokyo (Paris) in 2014. Thomas Hirschhorn has received different awards and prizes, among which : “Preis für Junge Schweizer Kunst” (1999), “Prix Marcel Duchamp” (2000), "Rolandpreis für Kunst im öffentlichen Raum" (2003), “Joseph Beuys-Preis” (2004) and the “Kurt Schwitters-Preis” (2011).

 

Museo MAN

Via S. Satta 27- 08100, Nuoro

tel. +39 0784 25 21 10

Open: 10 am to 1 pm | 3 to 7 pm | closed Mondays

www.museoman.it

 

Vivian Maier

Street Photographer

10/07/2015 - 18/10/2015

Vivian Maier

Street Photographer

10 July – 18 October 2015

 

Vivian Maier at the MAN of Nuoro

Her first exhibition in an Italian museum

120 photographs, 10 films and a never-before-seen series of contact prints

by America's most famous "nanny"

 

After the United States, the fascination of Vivian Maier is enchanting Europe.

A nanny for New York's and Chicago's wealthy families starting from the 1950s, for over five decades she shot life in the streets of the cities where she lived, without ever making her work known. Never an exhibition, not even a marginal one, never a publication.

What she has left us is an enormous archive, with more than 150,000 negatives, a multitude of undeveloped Super 8 or 16mm footage, recordings, notes and other papers of different kinds that the "French" nanny (her mother came from the Provençal Alps) accumulated in her rooms, jealously hoarding it all.

Later confined to a storeroom, the material was confiscated in 2007 due to unpaid rent and then discovered by the young John Maloof at an auction in Chicago.

The exhibition at the MAN of Nuoro, curated by Anne Morin and organized together with diChroma Photography, will be the first exhibition of Vivian Maier's work in an Italian public institution.

Starting from the material collected by John Maloof, the project for the exhibition provides an overview of Vivian Maier's work, emphasizing the key elements of her poetics, such as the obsession for documentation and accumulation, fundamental in the construction of her true artistic as well as biographic profile.

Together with 120 photographs among the most important in Maloof's archive, shot between the early years of the 1950s and the end of the 1960s, the exhibition also presents a series of Super 8 films and a selection of colour photographs taken starting from the middle of the 1960s. With no storyline or camera movements, the footage reveals her way of approaching her subject and provides useful clues in interpreting her work as a photographer.

Instead, the shots from the 1970s reveal the change in her viewpoint, when she traded her Rolleiflex for a Leica, which obliged her to raise the camera from waist to eye level, offering her new possibilities for sight and narration.

The exhibition will also be enhanced by a series of  contact prints, never before exhibited, useful in understanding the vision and development of this American photographer.

What enraptures the public, even before her photographs, is the story of "Nanny Vivian”, perfect for an existential novel or the plot of a wry comedy; it is so unusual, so fascinating that it does not seem real.

But beyond the story, beyond the biographical notes, the big-little secrets revealed by those who knew her, beyond her representation as an eccentric, reserved woman, strict and curious like few others, the custodian of a mystery still to be revealed, beyond all else stands the great photography of Vivian Maier, on whom much remains to be said.

For the most part, Vivian Maier took her photos in her spare time and, to judge from the results, we can surmise that in that period she did nothing else. Her favourite subjects were the streets and people, more rarely architecture, objects and landscapes.

She shot what suddenly appeared before her, whether it was strange, unusual, worthy of note or the commonest of everyday acts. Her world was "the others", strangers, the anonymous city folk with whom she came into contact for fleeting moments, always maintaining a certain distance which allowed her to turn the subjects portrayed unknowing into little-big stories of no importance.

But from time to time, in some of her more daring compositions, Vivian Maier made herself visible, she stepped over the threshold onto the stage to become part of the story. The reflection of her face on a window pane, the projection of her shadow on the ground, her silhouette appears on the edges of many images, almost always broken by shadows or reflections, with the somewhat obsessive insistence of one who, together with an idea of the world, is above all in search of oneself. In this endless investigation she sometimes involved the children she was in care of, forcing them to follow her around the city, in often degraded neighbourhoods of New York or Chicago. To a sensitive and kindly glance at the humble and outcast, she added a sarcastic vein evident in many of her snapshots, aimed randomly at all, from the wealthy members of the bourgeoisie in the good neighbourhoods to the drifters on the outskirts.

“Of Vivian Maier", states Lorenzo Giusti, MAN's director, "today we speak as a great 20th-century photographer, on the same level as the masters of street photography, from Alfred Eisenstaedt to Robert Frank, from Diane Arbus to Lisette Model. But the great museums find it difficult to legitimize her work, both because in her entire lifetime she had not a single occasion to exhibit it, and owing to their pervasive - and legitimate - diffidence towards the activity of the 'amateurs'. But it is no secret that the museums always arrive a bit late.

Of Vivian Maier's work we are captivated not only by her capacity for observation, the watchful eye alert to every variation of the whole, her talent for composition and framing. What is most impressive is the ease with which she passes from one register to another, from current events to tragedy, to the absurd, always resolutely faithful to her eye. Hers is a voice for a long time out of the chorus, but without doubt in tune”.

 

Info:

MAN Museum  Via S. Satta 27- 08100 Nuoro  

tel. +39 0784 25 21 10

opening hours: 10 AM - 1 PM | 3 PM -7 PM. Closed Monday

www.museoman.it

 

Press office Studio ESSECI, Sergio Campagnolo

gestione2@studioesseci.net  tel. 049663499

 

The Permanence of Resistance # 1

Twenty-five years of artistic research in Sardinia (1957-1983)

17/04/2015 - 28/06/2015

MAN, Nuoro Province Museum of Art

17 April – 28 June 2015

Opening: Friday, 17 April at 7:00 PM

Press release

La costante resistenziale (The Permanence of Resistance) is a project that presents an overview of the most innovative research which, starting from the early years of Sardinia’s regional autonomy and up to the present, has characterized the island’s artistic scenario. By the end of 2017, this three-year programme will provide a reconstruction of six decades of experimental activities, highlighting themes, events, groups and personalities.

The finding of a possible "specific connotation", of the permanence of resistance in the different experiences, represents the backbone of this project. The "Sardinian permanence of resistance" is a concept with which the archaeologist Giovanni Lilliu attempted to describe the age-old struggle of the Sardinian people against the colonial powers which time after time have arrived on the island's coasts. “Sardinia”, wrote Lilliu, “has at all times had a strange historical characteristic: that of always being dominated (and to some extent even today), but of having constantly resisted this. It is an island that for centuries experienced the heavy hand of colonizers, but which systematically opposed them with the claw of resistance. Thus, Sardinians have undergone the aggression represented by attempts at assimilation of all kinds, but despite this they have succeeded in conserving their integrity.”

Within the framework of the investigation into artistic and cultural production, the concept of "permanence of resistance" is seen as an ideal metaphor and at the same time a benchmark as a privileged vantage point from which to observe the development of artistic practices and expressive languages in the light of external influences, of critical debate and national and international trends, now accepted, now refused, affirmed or reinterpreted.

The first of the three exhibitions, Venticinque anni di ricerca artistica in Sardegna (Twenty-five Years of Artistic Research in Sardinia), to take place at the MAN Museum from 17 April to 28 June 2015, will focus on the generation of artists that emerged in Sardinia between 1957 and 1983. This period, as indicated by the title, refers to an important historical precedent: the exhibition held in 1983 in the City of Nuoro and the Sebastiano Satta Public Reading Consortium curated by Salvatore Naitza and Sandra Piras, which featured the production of the last quarter of the century with the works of a large group of artists of different backgrounds and tendencies.

The choice of 1957 as the starting point of the innovation can be explained by an important event that took place in Nuoro. That year at the Biennial of Art, a jury composed of Elena Baggio, Felice Casorati, Mario Delitala, Rodolfo Pallucchini and Marco Valsecchi assigned the Premio Sardegna for painting to Mauro Manca for his work entitled L’ombra del mare sulla collina (The Shadow of the Sea on the Hill); a painting with a Cubist matrix which, in anticipating the experiments into sign and matter that the artist pursued in the following years, marked a clear divide between figurative and abstract experiences.

The spreading of the new language took place in Sardinia when Mauro Manca moved to Sassari as the director of the State Art Academy (1959), which under his direction became a point of reference for advanced studies, and with the founding in Cagliari of centres of research such as “Studio 58” and, in the following decade, the “Gruppo Iniziativa” (Initiative Group), which was active from 1960 to 1965, the “Gruppo Transazionale” (Transactional Group)(1966), under the methodological guidance of Corrado Maltese, and the “Centro di Cultura Democratica” (Center for Democratic Culture), founded in 1967.

Around Manca and his school there developed the “Gruppo A” (1962), which brought together the ideas of the protagonists of Sassari's new generation. Its legacy was later taken up by the “Gruppo della Rosa” (The Group of the Rose)(1976) within which came to light the works of the artists who graduated from the art academy and returned to it as teachers.

Created in the region's two major cities, these groups were not always homogeneous, being flanked by independent personalities of different orientations. In the overall picture that takes into account its geographic and cultural specificities, Nuoro has always been a centre of production and promotion of Sardinian culture open to outside influences.

The 1960s and ‘70s in Sardinia were also the years of militant criticism which, on the pages of the local newspapers, saw intellectuals of different extractions (art historians, anthropologists, linguists) participate in a debate on the parallel refusal both of a narrow regionalism and an affected cosmopolitanism. It was a complex and sometimes contradictory experience, on the brink between an internal dimension in defining its own cultural specificity, and an external one, in the awareness of the need to include Sardinia's cultural issues in the framework of international coordinates.

La costante resistenziale #1. Artists: Italo Antico, Antonio Atza, Gaetano Brundu, Paolo Bullitta, Zaza Calzia, Giovanni Campus, Giovanni Canu, Sergio Cara, Giovanni Carta, Tonino Casula, Aldo Contini, Salvatore Coradduzza, Paola Dessy, Nino Dore, Angelino Fiori, Gino Frogheri, Maria Lai, Ermanno Leinardi, Angelo Liberati, Carlo Loi, Mauro Manca, Nicolò Masia, Luigi Mazzarelli, Mirella Mibelli, Rosetta Murru, Luciano Muscu, Costantino Nivola, Primo Pantoli, Igino Panzino, Giuseppe Pettinau, Gaetano Pinna, Giovanni Pintori, Roberto Puzzu, Rosanna Rossi, Vincenzo Satta, Pinuccio Sciola, Giovanna Secchi, Antonio Secci, Agostino Sini, Ugo Ugo, Italo Utzeri.

“The Permanence of Resistence” is a multi-years project of the Man Museum, conceived by Lorenzo Giusti, that will be developed with the support of several researchers. The first of the three exhibition scheduled, “Twenty five years of artistic research”, is curated by Emanuela Manca with the advice of Rosanna Rossi and Silvano Tagliagambe.

 

 

WERNER BISCHOF

10/10/2012 - 03/12/2012

 

The Werner Bischof photo exhibition, curated by the Werner Bischof Foundation of Paris, the Magnum Photos
Agency and the Agenzia Contrasto, is jointly organized by Imago Multimedia Nuoro photo agency and publishers
and the MAN Museum of Nuoro. With over 100 photographs including a selection of the artist’s most famous
snapshots, it also comprises 30 photos taken in Sardinia in 1950, many of which have never been published previously
and here make their world début.
It is a unique event in Sardinia – 130 of the most famous of Bischof’s photographs including a series of unpublished
works. This exhibit constitutes an exhaustive retrospective and a journey to the heart of the production of
one of the most important photo-reporters of the 20th century, a world-renowned and extraordinarily talented artist.
In fact, in 1949 Werner Bischof was the first photographer to become a member of Magnum. He possessed
the faculty of combining an objective documentary-type observation of reality devoid of all manipulation of the
observer’s eye with a lyrical, almost intimate, vision of the situation and subject. As he himself stated on several
occasions, he felt he was more of an artist than a photo-reporter. Indeed, not many photographers have been
able to condense in such a short time span of professional activity such profound and sharp observation, cognisant
and absolutely original at the same time. Rejecting the “superficiality and sensationalism” of photo magazines,
Bischof dedicated the greater part of his life to the study of traditional culture, an oftentimes neglected
sector which allowed him to maintain a distance from editors eager for cover photos. He was thus able to travel
throughout the world carrying out exceptional reporting on society at large: Japan, Indochina, Korea, India, where
in 1951 he carried out his famous famine reportage series for Life magazine; Mexico, Hong Kong, Panama and
Peru where he died at the age of 38. The photos of these reportages which appeared in the major magazines and
photo magazines of the world are visible for the first time in Sardinia in this exhibit at the MAN Museum of Nuoro.
A vital aspect of the exhibit at the MAN Museum in Nuoro is the presence of an entire section dedicated to the
photos WERNER BISCHOF shot in SARDINIA in 1950, some of which are being made public for the first time.
Bischof was sent to the island by “Epoca” to document the dire work conditions of the Campidano inhabitants and
the miners of the Iglesiente area. His reportage is characterized by his total immersion in the milieu. The seriousness
of the themes in question, which prompted expressionism on the part of many of his photo-reporter colleagues,
was for him the opportunity to pick up on the less dramatic aspect of facts and people. He achieved this
result using the “slightly out of focus” stylistic solution, providing a fresh outlook on the events. The photos taken
in Sardinia, while complying with the desire for a certain level of formality, find a trade-off between aesthetics and
objective rigour in their search for balance of image: high cuts, centred shot, lowered and highlighted foreground.
His mastery of technique allowed him to choose the best of a “one-shot” moment. Bischof’s humanity is all the
more evident in his choice of subjects: the daily life of people rather than the land; it is the Sardinia of the inhabitants
rather than the idea of an abstract lineage or an offended and hurting earth. And with the capture of the lightness
of a subject’s smile he succeeds in transcending the horrors and devastation left by the war.

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